As the timeline for Brexit shifts and no clear statement on the future of trade, Bloomberg, revisits the perennial question for pharma of supply. They highlight Novo Nordisk keeping an inventory of insulin at more than twice normal levels and asked for John Rountree’s opinion on this crucial topic: “Keeping extra supplies on hand is only one of the challenges. Brexit raises questions about new investment in manufacturing in the U.K. and bringing talented people into the country.”

Read the full article here

With the publication of the Novasecta Global 100, John Rountree, was invited on CNBC today to expand on some of the trends in our report, and in particular how attitudes towards M&A are changing in the sector and for investors.

John highlights the low revenue growth for 6 of the top 10 companies and how mega-mergers are no longer the solution to growth, highlighting the recent deal between BMS and Celgene. Instead he underlines the importance of smaller collaborative partnerships, such as the alliance between Regeneron and Alnylam, which allows both companies to focus on their strengths whilst utilising the support of their partners. Since our inception we have held a firm belief in the value of strategic collaborations.

CNBC also delve into the topic of whether tech giants will eat away at various segments in healthcare; to which John emphasises the difference in the approaches of tech and pharma and why tech companies’ consumer focused platforms might gain good traction in the healthcare sector.

Follow the links to read the Novasecta Global 100 or to learn more about achieving growth through strategic collaborations.

The Novasecta Global 100 is a comprehensive look at how the world’s top pharma companies are shaping the future of healthcare.

 

Our report analyses the companies as whole entities rather than pharma business alone in order to fully explore the impact of their diverse business models and choices. We cover their performance across multiple dimensions, their capital allocation choices, their innovation models, and their commercial models. We explain how the Global 100 is:

• Highly diverse: headquartered in many different countries, with very different business models

• Innovative: with many alternative approaches to investing in new solutions for patients

• Commercially successful: achieving impressive profitability and revenue growth through value or volume, yet finding it harder to sustain top-line revenue growth at the top

• Collaborative: with partnerships across country boundaries becoming more favoured than M&A to develop and provide access to medicines

 

In our report we touch upon how companies are dealing with many of the issues currently facing them, including patent expiry, new commercial models, the changing role of Medical Affairs, approaches to innovation and whether to pursue M&A or strategic collaborations.

 

If you would like to join us for a webinar our Managing Partner, John Rountree, will be hosting 3 webinars to discuss the Global 100 report and how pharma companies are shaping the future of healthcare:

2 pm BST 17th April 2019

5 pm BST 29th April 2019

9 am BST 30th April 2019

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

Commercial models in pharma have evolved over the last few decades moving from brand focussd to access led and now the future is one of personalisation, where all aspects of an organisation’s commercial approach are tailored to individual patients, HCPs and payors based on their unique needs. To achieve this, companies and commercial teams will need to change.

We consider how:

• Pharma’s future commercial model use machine learning (ML) and agile marketing to make the most of multiple data sources to bring personalised messages to physicians and payors

• Companies need to combine products with ‘beyond the pill’ solutions that support product use such as wearable technology, patient support services and digital adherence programmes

• The threat of complete disruption from other sectors is unlikely due to the highly capital intensive and risky nature of the pharma business

• Achieving personalisation requires substantive change to processes, capabilities and culture – such change is hard, and history teaches us that this can be slow in the pharma industry

• Companies that embrace the opportunity of personalisation are those that will see the greatest results

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

Medical Affairs is in the midst of an exciting metamorphosis. The global shift towards evidence-based care is creating new opportunities for the function to play a more strategic role within pharmaceutical companies.

As medicines become more targeted and the evidence base more nuanced, Medical Affairs has the potential to become one of the key influencers of the future….

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

Margins have, until recently, not been a great cause for concern to many pharma companies but as the healthcare landscape changes we believe margins will be an area that many companies cannot ignore.

In this month’s white paper, we look at why pharma needs to rethink its approach to day-to-day spending and start to foster a culture that connects spending with return on investment…

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

One of the pharmaceutical industry’s longest-held mantras is that the first six months of a product launch defines future success. This can lead to too much focus on performance compared to a forecast, rather than building for future success by seeking a deep understanding of why a product is performing. To read our latest insight please complete the form below.

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

AI is one of the hottest topics in pharma at the moment and is already starting to yield results. One area it is making significant impact is in R&D. In the last two years alone there have been several multi million pound deals with leading pharma companies and AI providers, one of the most recent being the GSK collaboration with Cloud Pharmacuticals, who we interviewed earlier this month. R&D has always been a strong area for Novasecta and given our expertise MedNous asked us to think about how pharma companies could approach AI in R&D.

For insight on what the wider pharma industry should do about AI click here

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

Novasecta’s Managing Partner, John Rountree, was asked by CNBC to comment on the rumours of the sale of GSK’s Horlicks brand to Unilever, in which he reflects on GSK’s continued exploration of ways to refocus its business towards innovative pharmaceuticals.

To read our insight into R&D innovation click here or to understand the importance of R&D renewal click here.

Artificial intelligence is one of the hottest topics in the pharmaceutical industry and there seems to be an almost daily stream of stories about its benefits. This is leading to questions about whether the hype is justified, and if it be shortly replaced by something else. To get an insider’s perspective, Ed Corbett a Principal at Novasecta, interviewed Don Van Dyke, Chief Operating Officer of Cloud Pharmaceuticals to hear his thoughts on what the potential of AI is and whether the hype is justified.

To read our whitepaper on “What Pharma Should Do About AI” click here

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

On average in 2018 over 58% of sales for big pharma have come from products over 10 years old. ‘Mature’, ‘Established’ or ‘Diversified’ brands are products that have lost or are approaching loss of patent exclusivity and represent a significant source of revenue for pharmaceutical companies.

In 2000, few in the pharmaceutical industry had heard of mature brands. Yet now the vast majority of pharma companies have either entire portfolios or significant business units dedicated to their commercialisation. This shift in emphasis has been driven by reduced R&D productivity and the realisation that managed well, mature brands can provide strong profits following patent expiry. In this white paper, we explore the importance of mature brands to pharma companies, how best to approach loss of patent exclusivity and how best-in-class teams are commercialising mature brands effectively and redefining traditional life cycle management.

To find out how we can help with your commercial strategy click here

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

AI has the potential to provide huge benefits to the pharmaceutical industry, from improving R&D productivity through to more effective sales representative deployment and better supply chain management. Adoption of AI is lagging other sectors, with initial forays mainly being led by big pharma who have deep pockets and are willing to try new innovations. For many however, it remains misunderstood, or even feared. Given the transformative potential of AI, companies must at the very least understand its benefits and develop a strategy that meets each organisation’s unique situation. Those that do will be well informed to make decisions; those that don’t, may be left out of the next industrial revolution.

For an insider’s view on what the potential of AI is and whether the hype is justified read our interview with Don Van Dyke, COO of Cloud Pharmaceuticals

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

AI – the acronym on everyone’s lips, and rightly so, as it has a huge variety of potential applications in pharma. In light of this, Pharmaceutical Market Europe (PME) asked Ed Corbett for a special report piece, to consider AI and how pharma should navigate this burgeoning technology.

To read the full article click here or download this article using the button above.

If you want to learn more about AI in pharma our white paper on the topic gives great insight into what pharma should do about AI or for an insider’s perspective our interview with Don Van Dyke, COO of Cloud Pharmaceuticals, looks at what the potential of AI is and whether the hype is justified

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

John Rountree discusses, on CNBC, Novartis financial results, pharma innovation and how acquisitions in Big Pharma are still a hot topic

To read our insight on breakthrough innovation click here and for our point of view on the cost of pharma M&A click here

 

Novasecta’s Principal, Ed Corbett, was asked by The Pharma Letter, in a special report piece, to consider an issue of paramount importance to the future of the industry: AI

Artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to provide huge benefits to the pharmaceutical industry, from improving R&D productivity through to more effective sales representative deployment and better supply chain management.

Adoption of AI is lagging other sectors, with initial forays mainly being led by big pharma, with its deep pockets and willingness to try new innovations. For many, however, it remains misunderstood, or even feared.

Given the transformative potential of AI, companies must at the very least understand its benefits and develop a strategy that meets each organization’s unique situation

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

Novasecta defines European MidPharmas to be R&D-based pharmaceutical companies with sustaining annual revenues of between €50m and €5bn. In our fourth annual report into this fascinating sector, we examine the current health of these companies, drawing on both our extensive consulting experience with such companies and our proprietary research based on public domain data sources. We highlight important lessons for pharma and biotech companies of all sizes

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

As the escalating cost of both M&A and R&D continues to challenge the global pharmaceutical industry, CEOs know that it’s incumbent on them to explore innovative ways to grow their businesses. The most entrepreneurial have recognised the significant opportunity to create business value through strategic collaborations. Initiating collaborations is complex and difficult. However, the most successful examples show that it helps organisations to fuel transformative growth by establishing a deeper strategic focus and a more effective deployment of high-value assets and capabilities. In this paper we examine the need for strategic collaborations, examples from pioneers, and the lessons learned from our experiences with making them happen.

To view our content please complete the form below and submit





 

Please click submit and wait for the page to refresh

Novasecta’s Managing Partner, John Rountree, was asked by Reuters to reflect on Christophe Weber’s, CEO of Takeda, comments on the cuts to R&D after their deal with Shire:

“They are cutting quite deep in R&D and it is not clear if the amount of money they are saving is going to be beneficial or harmful. Merging R&D is never easy. There are going to be lay-offs and that creates uncertainty and disruption and sometimes the best talent just leaves.” To view the full Reuters article, click here.

This is not the first time John’s opinion has been sort on the deal having previously been asked for his thoughts by CNBC.

Newsletter Signup